What We Have Accomplished

 

Our yearly impact statements reflect exactly what we accomplished for the animals and the community during that given year. They also show what our goals were for the upcoming year and what goals were fullfilled from the previous year. You can read "Our History" for more detailed information about our organization and how it came to be.

 

Impact Statement 2013

 

Stevens County comprises 2,777 square miles and has a population of 43,430 but offers no animal control or county-funded animal shelter. CVAS takes in hundreds of companion animals every year and provides them with shelter, nourishment and medical care. Every animal is spayed/neutered and vaccinated, and when possible, placed in a loving home.

In 2013, we took in 608 cats and 207 dogs. We found homes for 255 cats and 198 dogs. Our county is large, but adoption opportunities are not. In 2013 we transported 350 cats and 9 dogs to partnering no-kill shelters in the Seattle area.

Through our TNR program, we work to control the number of feral cat colonies in Stevens County. We trapped 58 cats, transported them to clinics for spay/neuter surgery and vaccinations, and returned 34 to their colonies. 24 cats were put into our Barn Cat Program where they were re-homed into safe barn homes.

To assist struggling families and reduce pet over-population, we paid for spay/neuter surgeries for 50 “owned” companion animals. This included free transportation to and from the clinics and hundreds of pounds of dog and cat food to help these families keep their animals.

In 2013 we purchased our property and started much needed renovations. A partnership with Microsoft, through their Cat Calendar Foundation, provided us materials and help with operating expenses. We held three low cost spay/neuter clinics for both dogs and cats, a 5K Walk N’ Wag fundraiser and started a kindergarten program for five classrooms in Stevens County.

We plan to expand upon this to educate all grade school children on the compassionate care and training of companion animals. Our ultimate goal is to eradicate the pain and suffering caused by abuse, neglect and abandonment of these animals.

By collaborating with Stevens county Cat care and the Humane Society of the United States we will offer lesson plans and worksheets, training and a service-learning program for teachers and humane educators to reduce the overpopulation and the tragic need for sheltering.

 

Impact Statement 2012

 

Stevens county is a large, rural county offering no animal control or county-funded animal shelter.

 

CVAS takes in hundreds of companion animals every year and provides them with shelter, nourishment and medical care. Every animal is spayed/neutered and vaccinated, and when possible, placed in a loving home.


In 2012, we took in 619 cats and 147 dogs. We found homes for 185 cats and 107 dogs. Our county is large, but adoption opportunities are not. We transport hundreds of animals to partner shelters where the adoption opportunities are greater. In 2012 we transported 12 dogs and 367 cats.

 

Through our TNR program, we work to control the number of feral cat colonies in Stevens county. We trapped 60 cats, transported them to clinics for spay/neuter surgery and vaccinations, and returned 32 cats to their colonies. 28 cats were put into our Barn Cat Program where they will be re-homed. We placed 22 feral cats into safe barn homes.


To assist struggling families and reduce pet over-population, we paid for spay/neuter surgeries for 50 'owned' dogs and 68 'owned' cats. This included free transportation to and from the clinics. In addition, we gave thousands of pounds of dog/cat food to struggling families so they could keep their pets.


We raised the funds needed to purchase property for our future facility. One of our biggest goals for 2013 is to find the best property for our needs, and raise the funds for construction. Our new facility will be larger, safer and brighter, providing a more comfortable space for animals and humans alike.


In 2012 we created our website and started social networking through FaceBook, Twitter and a blog. Our expanded online efforts have already greatly increased adoption rates, donations and community recognition. We are now able to get our message out to the whole country, and not just the small and relatively poor population of Stevens County.




 

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